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Behaviors Preventing You From Being A Great Leader

Leadership skills can be vital to career advancement, as well as the ability to inspire others to perform at an optimal level. That said, certain habits might prevent individuals from becoming effective leaders. Someone may be an ineffective leader if they display any of the following attributes: Negative Thinking Effective leaders need to project positivity […]

Leadership skills can be vital to career advancement, as well as the ability to inspire others to perform at an optimal level. That said, certain habits might prevent individuals from becoming effective leaders. Someone may be an ineffective leader if they display any of the following attributes:

Negative Thinking

Effective leaders need to project positivity at all times. Bosses who display negativity can infect their underlings and ultimately lead to a tense, uninspiring atmosphere where a workforce expresses a defeatist attitude. Such feelings might ultimately precipitate poor production. Even during difficult times, a good leader will project positivity and inspire subordinates to rise above all challenges.

Excessively Demanding Personalities

A leader is burdened with the responsibility of ensuring that specific job are performed, and the intended goals are met. While it is okay to express lofty expectations, being overly demanding is not. Most employees understand that the boss orchestrates the plans and disseminates the instructions; solid leaders should not do so in a definitive dictatorial or authoritative manner. Effective authorities can be firm but should be fair and be open to the opinion of others.

Being Too Judgmental

It is acceptable for authorities to assess and critique an employee’s performance. That said, such actions should be executed with designs on helping said individual perform their job functions more efficiently. Displaying an overly judgmental personality and expressing harsh criticism can intimidate staff members and eventually lead to resentment.

Always Needing To Be Right

Granted, individuals who have attained leadership positions have done so because they are intelligent, capable and typically render the right decisions. That said, no one is always correct. Good leaders do not project the need to consistently be correct. Said professionals realize that there may be circumstances in which the opinions or interpretations of others might be the most effective way to proceed in resolving a problem or completing a task.

Failing To Teach

Most leaders are knowledgeable. However, one telltale sign of a poor leader is someone who fails to teach this knowledge to their underlings. Effective brain trusts apply the knowledge they have gained to every situation and are not afraid of sharing said information with those working for them.

This article was originally published on JamesKassouf.co.

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