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“Be aware of your fears, but don’t let them manage you.” With Dr. Ely Weinschneider & Eyal Feldman

“Be aware of your fears, but don’t let them manage you.” It is not about being fearless. Fear is a warning sign sometimes for good reason, sometimes not. We should be aware of our fears, and we should listen to them, but then when it’s time to make decisions and act, don’t let the fear […]

“Be aware of your fears, but don’t let them manage you.” It is not about being fearless. Fear is a warning sign sometimes for good reason, sometimes not. We should be aware of our fears, and we should listen to them, but then when it’s time to make decisions and act, don’t let the fear take over.


As a part of my series about the things we can do to remain hopeful and support each other during anxious times, I had the pleasure of interviewing Eyal Feldman the founder and CEO of Stampli, a software platform that automates and streamlines the accounts payable process. Prior to Stampli, Eyal was VP of Business Solutions at Ness, a leading IT solutions provider, where he gained government-wide agreement for the now paperless administration and built the Documentum business in Israel from the ground up to market leadership. Eyal earned his MBA from Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management and BA in Economics from Ben-Gurion University.


Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the backstory about what brought you to your specific career path?

Early on, I saw the benefits of adding documents to digitized business processes. But, then I almost lost my job due to a missing invoice. In fact, it actually almost ruined the business I managed because that invoice was for one of our key partners with a significant revenue contribution. This was an a-ha moment that identified a real gap in the market around AP automation. No one was really doing it in a fully digitized way. There were outsourced versions and heavy BPM versions, but I knew how to solve this in a modern way. In general, I love the art of solving a problem…and I always knew I would build a company.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story or explain why it resonated with you so much?

Blink by Malcolm Gladwell. It’s about our gut feelings, sixth sense — how they work, how powerful they are, how to listen to them and when to be careful listening to them. I read it many years ago but I still think about it a lot.

Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. Many people have become anxious from the dramatic jolts of the news cycle. The fears related to the coronavirus pandemic have heightened a sense of uncertainty, fear, and loneliness. From your perspective can you help our readers to see the “Light at the End of the Tunnel”? Can you share your “5 Reasons To Be Hopeful During this Corona Crisis”? If you can, please share a story or example for each.

We should remember this situation is temporary. Most of the issues this situation brought on us will resolve once COVID-19 resolves — and it will. It can be fast, or it can take some time, but it will be over. It is comforting to try and predict when, but nobody really knows.

I suggest everybody make the necessary arrangements as if things will remain this way for a while. Not because it necessarily will, but because we don’t know when it will end, and we need to adjust to this new “normal” to be efficient and think clearly. Get the comfortable desk you need, arrange the new “family vs. work balance,” and progress things without waiting for change to happen.

Reasons to be hopeful during this time:

  1. Business SaaS applications that allow remote work will have a boost (during) and after these events.
  2. The opportunity to spend more quality time with family when it matters. Have lunch with your kids!
  3. The global crisis seems to bring out the best in people. People are more patient to others, more kind. Let’s make at least some of this stay with us.
  4. This situation shows us that as much as we hate the uncertainty and anxiety it brings, we are much better at dealing with it than we realize. This experience is very powerful and will remain with us forever.
  5. Extreme situations like this take us out of the “auto” mode we have in our lives and brings us the opportunity to become a better version of ourselves, learn new stuff, stay alert to the changes happening all around, get a new hobby, become physically fit, and much more.

From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to effectively offer support to those around us who are feeling anxious? Can you explain?

  1. Spend time with them talking about anything.
  2. Get them off the news (promise them you will update them with anything material they should know, but get them off the news).
  3. Talk about their fears. Being anxious and being afraid are not the same. The fear has an immediate reason, anxiety is disconnected from a specific event that just happened.
  4. Suggest they do one thing that takes them away from thinking about their fear… a hobby, a conversation, anything that allows for a few minutes not to think about it.
  5. Meditate, work out, do NLP…

What are the best resources you would suggest to a person who is feeling anxious?

Workout: Studies show that exercise can elevate a depressed mood, even if temporary it can offer several hours of relief. The ADAA (Anxiety and Depression Association of America offers these great tips.

Mindfulness/NLP: Learn more about Neuro-linguistic-Programming

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

“Be aware of your fears, but don’t let them manage you.” It is not about being fearless. Fear is a warning sign sometimes for good reason, sometimes not. We should be aware of our fears, and we should listen to them, but then when it’s time to make decisions and act, don’t let the fear take over.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Be Kind Movement. I think the current situation brings the best out of people. We are all going through the same thing, and thus it is easy to understand how others feel and be emphatic. The Be Kind Movement would help us all default to that place of empathy and compassion, to be kind even when we aren’t going through the same thing and we don’t know exactly how others feel.

What is the best way our readers can follow you online?

Of course, www.stampli.com.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/feldmaneyal/

Twitter: @feldman_eyal

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