Community//

“Be aware, but don’t be afraid.” With Beau Henderson & Dr. Cindy Trimm

Be aware, but don’t be afraid. As I said earlier, sometimes we need to turn off the noise and step away from the distractions, even if that means you turn off the news for a few hours because things feel overwhelming. And remember — humanity has overcome pandemics before. If we look back through history, […]

Be aware, but don’t be afraid. As I said earlier, sometimes we need to turn off the noise and step away from the distractions, even if that means you turn off the news for a few hours because things feel overwhelming. And remember — humanity has overcome pandemics before. If we look back through history, we’ve always come out better and revolutionized through the darkest times. I firmly believe we as humans will do just that once again.


As a part of my series about “How To Develop Mindfulness And Serenity During Stressful Or Uncertain Times”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Cindy Trimm.

Cindy Trimm has dedicated her life to serving God and humanity. A best-selling author, Trimm is a sought-after empowerment specialist, revolutionary thinker, and transformational leader. Her best-selling books The Prayer Warrior’s Way; The Art of War for Spiritual Battle; Hello, Tomorrow!; Commanding Your Morning and her newest release, Goodbye, Yesterday! have sold more than one million copies combined.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the backstory about what brought you to your specific career path?

Itravel to different places around the world multiple times a year. Each time, I am reminded boldly of the obstacles facing humanity, as well as the collective power we have to bring out extensive change for people all around the world. I look at this world as a global village, so it brings me great joy to bring people together and bring innovative, yet practical solutions to the problems we face.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

I’d say this year has been an interesting story in itself! We’re not even halfway through the year and so much has happened to deeply affect the world as we know it, although I’ve been working on finding moments to reflect and be grateful for.

What advice would you give to other leaders about how to create a fantastic work culture?

First, you need to start where you are. There’s no reason to wait until you think you, or those who work with you, will be in a better position, have more money, be more secure or whatever you may be waiting on. Wherever you are, is exactly where you need to be to make a fresh start. Secondly, during this time of transition, it’s important to also remember that transitions are the genesis of your transformation. Transitions take place between periods of preparation and reflection. This is a global transition period and I think everyone needs to use it wisely. The world into which we were born no longer exists. There is a clear and immediate demand for new, industry-specific thought leadership and workforce skill sets. Leaders everywhere need to be aware of that and make appropriate adjustments. The world is changing very quickly and we must prepare to move forward as a global family. The world we once knew, no longer exists.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story or explain why it resonated with you so much?

“13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do,” written by Amy Morin. She outlines behaviors that you should not practice if you want to “take back your own power, embrace change, face your fears, and train your brain for happiness and success.” These traits are essential to developing the grit it takes to see your assignment through to completion

Ok, thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. From your experience or research, how would you define and describe the state of being mindful?

Being mindful requires focus and intention. There is no such thing as mindfulness without those other two components. Sometimes, mindfulness is being aware of the effort you put into something versus what you might be getting from it. Other times, mindfulness requires a bit of separation from noise, distractions or simply anything that doesn’t serve you. I think that’s especially important to consider during times like this: limiting the noise and distractions that can cause us stress and putting true effort into what brings us joy and peace.

This might be intuitive to you, but it will be instructive to spell this out. Can you share with our readers a few of the physical, mental, and emotional benefits of becoming mindful?

Being mindful can not only bring mental peace and clarity, but also a calming spirit to your senses. Then it creates a sort of ripple effect. Mental and physical health can have a 1:1 relationship with each other; they affect each other so when one is being worked on, the other can reap some of those benefits. Having both can give your emotions a boost, as well. The three are connected and it can all stem from being mindful.

Ok. Here is the main question of our discussion. The past 5 years have been filled with upheaval and political uncertainty. Many people have become anxious from the dramatic jolts of the news cycle. The fears related to the coronavirus pandemic have only heightened a sense of uncertainty, anxiety, fear, and loneliness. From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to develop mindfulness and serenity during such uncertain times? Can you please share a story or example for each.

  • Educate and inform to limit fear and to help people engage in health protocols. There are a lot of changes that will come, from the development of a new vaccine to social distancing and reopening protocols, and it’s important that we are hone in and educate ourselves.
  • Get involved with problem-solving and crisis management discussions. As the world changes, we still have a voice in what will come. Whether you want to lobby your local elected officials to make the best decisions regarding online technology for businesses and schools or support healthcare policy changes, getting involved in those discussions is a great way to engage with others who may be feeling the same way as you.
  • Be friendly, too. There is no harm in calling a loved one, waving hello to your neighbor or thanking the mailperson, from six feet away of course. It will do you and them some good.
  • De-stress. Make sure that you’re taking proactive steps in your own life to stay calm. You can’t pour from an empty cup, and that’s particularly true right now.
  • Be aware, but don’t be afraid. As I said earlier, sometimes we need to turn off the noise and step away from the distractions, even if that means you turn off the news for a few hours because things feel overwhelming. And remember — humanity has overcome pandemics before. If we look back through history, we’ve always come out better and revolutionized through the darkest times. I firmly believe we as humans will do just that once again.

From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to effectively offer support to those around us who are feeling anxious? Can you explain?

Each of those same steps can be applied to supporting others. If you’re educating yourself on what’s going on, why wouldn’t you encourage others to do the same? As you’re calling loved ones, why wouldn’t you make sure that they are social distancing as well as taking appropriate measures for self-care and mental health? That’s where the humanity element can shine through: what you’re willing to do for yourself, you must be willing to do for others.

What are the best resources you would suggest for someone to learn how to be more mindful and serene in their everyday life?

I’d recommend “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do” or even some of my own books. My most recently published work, “Goodbye, Yesterday!” offers tips for reframing your mindset, including if you need to be more mindful & serene.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would want each of us to make sure we’re all doing the best we can to help our neighbor — whether that’s a smile and simple wave from your yard or making sure they have enough resources to get through these tough times. It’ll go a long way while we transition into the next chapter of humanity.

What is the best way our readers can follow you online?

My website is trimminternational.com but on social media, I can be found @cindytrimm on Instagram and Twitter, @drcindytrimm on Facebook.

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We wish you only continued success in your great work!

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Learn more or join us as a community member!
Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

Studies In Selling: One On One With Dr. Cindy McGovern

by Adam Mendler
Community//

“Why you should never make business decisions based on money alone” With Cindy Anderson, founder of Thinc Strategy

by Akemi Sue Fisher
Community//

What #MeToo taught me about bottled up fear, terror and anger

by Mark Goulston, M.D.

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.