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Author Michelle Myers: “If you have a dream of impacting one million people, don’t focus on the masses; Focus on one, slowly and intentionally, investing in them so well, that they have no choice but to duplicate what you’ve done for them.”

If you would mentor one person for one year, then the next year, mentor someone else, while the person you mentored last year became a mentor for someone in their life, and that cycle continued for 20 years, one million people would be mentored. So if you have a dream of impacting one million people, […]


If you would mentor one person for one year, then the next year, mentor someone else, while the person you mentored last year became a mentor for someone in their life, and that cycle continued for 20 years, one million people would be mentored. So if you have a dream of impacting one million people, don’t focus on the masses. Focus on one, slowly and intentionally, investing in them so well, that they have no choice but to duplicate what you’ve done for them.


I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Michelle Myers. Michelle is an author, entrepreneur, and motivator. She is the founder and face of She Works His Way, a space devoted to encouraging, inspiring and training women to pursue their passions in life and in business, while prioritizing the people and things that matter most. A mother, pastor’s wife, author, and serial entrepreneur, Michelle launched She Works His Way as a platform that allows her to pour God’s truth into the lives of women in ministry and business. Previously, Michelle launched two other successful businesses: Myers Cross Training and Cross Training Couture, and wrote Famous in Heaven and at Home. Michelle lives in North Carolina with husband James and two boys, Noah and Cole, and daughter Shea.


Thank you so much for joining us Michelle! Can you share your story of Grit and Success? First can you tell us a story about the hard times that you faced when you first started your journey?

I think I was unprepared that there would be many wouldn’t support me as this idea moved from concept to concrete. Some did, and I genuinely believe we wouldn’t be where we are today without their wisdom and support. But there were many who mocked me, in a “joking” way, but it didn’t feel like a joke. It wasn’t just that they were making fun of my dream; they were making fun of my future.

As a people pleaser, I took it hard. And it would have probably been easier to quit. But I had to learn that moving in the direction of other people’s opinions will rarely get anyone where they need to go.

Where did you get the drive to continue even though things were so hard?

I kept getting mini glimpses of the impact our mission was having on others. It was hard, but every time I would be tempted to quit, someone would reach out with the encouragement I needed to keep going. At the end of the day, it has to come back to people. It’s not about the position, the platform, or even my performance. People are what keep you going. So no matter how much your business grows, as the leader, you have to somehow stay in touch with the people you’re reaching. Their stories and their success is the best driving force of motivation.

So how did Grit lead to your eventual success? How did Grit turn things around?

You can’t accomplish anything worthwhile without grit because things don’t grow overnight. And when you do experience growth, you’ll still make mistakes. Grit is the courage to admit when you’ve made a mistake and sacrifice to correct it. Grit is the courage to try again when you’ve failed before. Grit is the resolve that the mission matters, so quitting isn’t an option. I think we associate grit with mental toughness, and while that’s certainly true to some degree, I think the anchor of having grit is more a continuous pursuit of humility because humility keeps us teachable. And if we’re too busy trying to protect some fake image of perfection to be humble, grit gets devoured by our own pride. So for me, I realized that if the mission was so much bigger than me, it was crazy to attempt on my own. So we grew slow, adding to the team as often as we could. And our commitment to not get caught up in the “hurry up or get left behind” mentality is why we’re still here and still growing today.

So, how are things going today? 🙂

We are growing — and not just in a numerical sense, but in terms of business maturity. As time goes on, we are getting more and more clear on who we are and who we’re not. Who will connect and benefit from what we do and who won’t. Every month, we are more dialed in and providing more and more value to our clients and customers. So we’re not perfect, of course, but we are more determined than ever that our mission matters and we believe our best days are still to come.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

When I started my first business, which was in fitness, I inquired about sponsoring a 5K during my first week. I was clueless as to what it cost to get your logo on the back of everyone’s t-shirts, so thankfully, budget-priced me out from making a huge financial blunder at the very beginning.

But what I learned was more than my logo on the back of everyone’s shirt, what I really wanted was a shortcut. I wanted a steady influx of customers that I didn’t really have to work to get. But once I got a few customers, I realized that I needed to grow slow. That even if sponsoring a 5K had gotten me a bunch of customers at the beginning, I didn’t know how to support them, so I wouldn’t have kept them. So I learned pretty quickly that business shortcuts are rare, and when they appear, shouldn’t be used.

What do you think makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

I think she works HIS way stands out because ultimately, we stand for something much bigger than ourselves. Everyone on our team has God-given talents and abilities that they’ve honed into skills. We’re responsible, reliable, unified and consistent. Plus, we’re more than co-workers. It sounds cliche, but we really operate much more like a family than colleagues. You can’t fake that. Unity is something that’s hard to describe, but it’s also impossible to miss. I think others are drawn to the potential of real community where they’re consistent reminded that they’re known and they’re needed.

We have a conference each fall, and last year, one of our guest speakers, Clayton King, who has been speaking at Christian events for the last two and a half decades, said, “I’ll be honest: I don’t know that I’ve ever seen this kind of unity.” And he didn’t just mean our team. He was referring to the unity of our attendees and our team. Because we’re values-driven, these women are instantly connected because they share priorities. They might not know the name of all the women sitting around them, but they understand her. And that’s such an incredible gift.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Burn out typically happens when you’ve gotten sucked into the masses mentality. You started your business for a reason. There was a purpose that motivated you. There was a problem others were having that you knew you could help solve. So if you’re burning out, my guess is that you’ve distanced yourself from the reason you started in the first place. So as often as possible, crawl out from behind the pile of details and serve someone on the ground floor. That makes you remember why you do what you do.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story?

I’ve been blessed with some incredible mentors, but Chalene Johnson stands out as someone who believed in me before she ever had a reason to. The first time I met her at once of her events, I was walking away, and she said, “Hey Michelle, you know your two blogs?”

She was referring to my faith blog, where I would teach on the Bible, and my fitness blog, where I would share workout and nutrition tips. In my mind, I thought, “Yes….but I didn’t know you did!” But instead, I just nodded as my best attempt to not completely lose my cool that she even knew my name.

“Put them together,” she said, bringing her hands together. “It’s who you are.”

Those seven words sparked the last decade of my career. What started as faith + fitness, which allowed me to serve some, evolved into faith + business, which allows me to serve more. She has continued to be a mentor of mine, and I’m forever grateful that beyond her advice, she took the time to see me as an individual in the midst of a crowd and prove not just what she knows, but that she cares.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

Thanks to car rides with my dad growing up, I’ve listened to Dave Ramsey since I was in middle school, and I have loved following his evolution from helping others with their finances to helping leaders grow their businesses. Something he always talks about is raising your standard of giving instead of raising your standard of living. We’ve chosen to adopt that as our way of life. As our business has grown, we haven’t changed our lifestyle much, but we’ve been able to increase our generosity every year. There are few thrills like being able to meet the genuine need of another.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me before I started my company” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Be grateful for small beginnings.

In the beginning, I was eager for “more” constantly. But as I made more frequent mistakes (as all entrepreneurs were do!), I found myself consistently grateful that there wasn’t a larger audience to watch me fall on my face. Over the years, I’ve learned that business shortcuts only mean you arrive somewhere unprepared and prematurely. Grow slow, and learn in the smaller spaces so you can be prepared for the next level of growth.

2. Ditch the masses mentality.

Genuine connection takes longer and can’t be done as often as casual networking, but it yields much better results. No one likes to feel like they’re being yelled at through a megaphone while standing in crowd. So remember that a business that seeks to satisfy everyone will ultimately satisfy no one. Serve the person right in front of you. Repeat as often as possible.

3. Closing the back door of your business is way more valuable than a wide front door.

There’s a lot of focus on marketing these days, and marketing DOES matter. But what matters more is that when people do business with you that you exceed their expectations. So you better make sure that what people pay for is better than your marketing. Otherwise, they won’t stay. It takes 90% more time and energy to recruit a new customer than to retain an existing one. So have an attractive front door, sure. But unless you want to merely replace your business each month, you’ll have to learn how to close the back door so people stay.

4. Be better offline to be better online.

Social media strategy is a real thing. But if you want to have valuable things to say and share online, you better have something happening offline. So if you find that your online presence is suffering, online usually isn’t the problem. You probably need to make some offline adjustments so you have a better story to tell.

5. You are a person, not a brand.

Your business is a brand, but you are not. And the second that you attempt to be a brand MORE than you’re a person, you simultaneously sign yourself up for frustration, at minimum. You can’t be a business robot. You need social media free days. You need unplugged time with your family. You need friends. You need community. Even the best business makes a terrible life. So make sure that in building a business, you still make time to build a life.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

If you would mentor one person for one year, then the next year, mentor someone else, while the person you mentored last year became a mentor for someone in their life, and that cycle continued for 20 years, one million people would be mentored. So if you have a dream of impacting one million people, don’t focus on the masses. Focus on one, slowly and intentionally, investing in them so well, that they have no choice but to duplicate what you’ve done for them.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sheworksHisway/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/sheworkshisway

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sheworkshisway/

Personal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/michellelmyers/

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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