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A Checklist for Life and Business

That’s why tone-deaf sales pitches, script Bulletproof Profits Review reading, automated calls, and the like don’t work very well. Giving prospects the feeling that they care — about them, their life situation, their problems, their dreams, their goals — what they’re looking for. Good salespeople are great listeners, not talkers, and when they do talk, […]

That’s why tone-deaf sales pitches, script Bulletproof Profits Review reading, automated calls, and the like don’t work very well. Giving prospects the feeling that they care — about them, their life situation, their problems, their dreams, their goals — what they’re looking for. Good salespeople are great listeners, not talkers, and when they do talk, they come from a place of genuine desire to help their prospect get what s/he wants via the product or service being offered. They speak to the prospect’s best interests, not just their own.

As many coaches and mentors have pointed out, we are all salespeople, in a sense, even those of us who profess to hate selling. If you’ve ever put your best foot forward at a job interview, for example, checked every detail of your appearance, researched the company you’re applying to, investigated the position you’re applying for, tweaked your resume to your best advantage, you were selling –yourself.

If you wanted to impress someone special, did you ever buy a new outfit, have your hair done specially, learn about his or her hobbies and interests, cook a special meal, send him or her a bouquet or an unexpected note. Weren’t you selling yourself. We don’t usually think of it as selling, but truly, it is. To use the job analogy, we even think, I have to sell myself, to get the offer. And so you sell how good you’d be for the job and the company — not how getting hired will benefit you. In common with what a good salesperson does, you’re trying to fulfill a need and demonstrate that your product — in this case, you — is the best choice to make.

There’s a second stumbling block for many people in selling. They feel they have to convince the person they’re talking to, no matter how disinterested that person is. Don’t do it. It’s a terrible idea to try to turn an unwilling, negative prospect into an eager customer. In the first place, you inevitably begin to come across as the pushy, self-interested salesman you don’t want to be. You’ll also reinforce your prospect’s suspicion that, in accepting your offer, they’ll be investing in you, rather than investing in themselves, through you.

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