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5 Things You Need To Know To Successfully Manage a Team, With Aaron Steed of Meathead Movers

“Do not show favoritism. As a manager, you should be consistent with your approach to your people by praising them and providing…


“Do not show favoritism. As a manager, you should be consistent with your approach to your people by praising them and providing constructive criticism. All employees need motivation. If your employees know what to expect from you, they will know what to do much better rather than always having an emotional, irrational boss. Make sure they know you genuinely care, not just about the company, but about them. Ask them how the job went or how their life is going. Get personal. When they graduate from college, give them a congratulatory card. Care — it goes such a long way. At the end of the day, people care about how they felt about their colleagues and their managers. Business is not only what you achieve, it’s also about how you make people feel and how they will talk your business up when they move on.”


I had the pleasure to interview Aaron Steed the CEO of Meathead Movers

Thank you so much for joining us! Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that happened to you since you began leading the company?

When Meathead Movers was at its early stages, we were asked to move a live crow named Eddie who, to its dismay, had been packaged in a breathable box by his owner. We do not move animals for ethical and safety reasons, but the owner of Eddie was very adamant about us moving him in our trucks. Much to our surprise, when we arrived to the new home of this customer — so did Eddie!

How do you synchronize large teams to effectively work together?

Synchronizing large teams is a crucial factor in ensuring Meathead Movers is successful. Because we manage numerous teams throughout the region, and because many jobs vary in nature, we had to come up with an effective strategy — a point system. The point system is based on how many jobs our teams have covered in the past and how proficient they are in terms of experience. We vet out each job, and depending on the complexity of a job, we assign the appropriate staff.

Our dispatchers are conscious of which teams work best together. Our “Stud/Dud” forms help us collect feedback from customers and from the teams that work together as a way to help us understand how we can better serve our customers on the next job. It’s a humble system tied up with match-making — choosing the right people for the right job.

What is the top challenge when managing global teams in different geographical locations? Can you give an example or story?

One of the top challenges of managing teams in different geographical locations is accountability.

Working in the same office as your team, or at least within a reasonable distance, gives you a better sense of what the teams are working on, how well they are getting the work done and what they are doing to get it done correctly. If an issue occurs, and you do not have a strong leader present in the region, the problem will not become evident until you see the scores, surveys and other features that may measure the rate of success. Ensuring accountability requires strong leadership in every location.

What advice would you give to other CEOs or founders to help their employees to thrive?

If I could advise other CEOs and founders on how to help their employees thrive, I would say really get to know your employees and what they are looking for in their life. I think it is important to break down their walls, get them to be comfortable and never accept dishonest answers during the interview process. Help them find comfort in discomfort by getting to know what makes them tick, what they want from their job and what they are working toward. Align the employment opportunity with those goals as much as possible.

Most times when people quit their jobs they actually “quit their managers”. What are your thoughts on retaining talent today?

Do not show favoritism. As a manager, you should be consistent with your approach to your people by praising them and providing constructive criticism. All employees need motivation. If your employees know what to expect from you, they will know what to do much better rather than always having an emotional, irrational boss. Make sure they know you genuinely care, not just about the company, but about them. Ask them how the job went or how their life is going. Get personal. When they graduate from college, give them a congratulatory card. Care — it goes such a long way. At the end of the day, people care about how they felt about their colleagues and their managers. Business is not only what you achieve, it’s also about how you make people feel and how they will talk your business up when they move on.

Based on your personal experience, what are the “5 Things You Need To Know To Successfully Manage a Team”. (Please share a story or example for each, Ideally an example from your experience)

1. Live by the company’s goal and vision — Establish what you are working toward and work backwards.

2. Know your leaders — Strong leadership is crucial. If you have a leader who is happy, lives strong, does well in life and upholds a positive outlook in life, you have a strong leader.

3. Put yourself and your team in a position to succeed — People should have a good office, a good work/life balance and there should be fast internet available. Add more incentives for your team to come to the office and they are more likely show up and perform.

4. Build the right team — Provide clarity, strategy and accountability for your team to effectively work toward everyone’s goals.

5. Refrain from working in the business, refrain from reacting to problems and don’t over socialize — If you operate within those quadrants, that is where you will get the highest use out of yourself and everyone else.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Figure out what you want and attack it.”

I have been living by this quote since the day I started. If I have an idea, I don’t hesitate or sit on it. I make moves to get it done.

Originally published at medium.com

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