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“5 Things We Must Do To Improve” With Beau Henderson & Dr. Hillary Goldsher

This kind of healthcare overhaul would need support at all levels of our healthcare system. Advocacy has to occur at the individual level. State and federal legislation must be enacted after a think tank of experts and end users vet out the most effective solutions. Funding will need to be mobilized from public and private […]

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This kind of healthcare overhaul would need support at all levels of our healthcare system. Advocacy has to occur at the individual level. State and federal legislation must be enacted after a think tank of experts and end users vet out the most effective solutions. Funding will need to be mobilized from public and private sectors. Community, state and national experts should launch a collaborative campaign that deeply educates the public about the costs of untreated mental health conditions. Personal well-being, professional productivity and lives are lost to mental health struggles every day. A robust system that provides support and treatment would reduce those tangible, quantifiable and devastating losses.


As part of our series about 5 Steps That Each Of Us Can Take To Proactively Help Heal Our Country, I had the pleasure of interviewing Clinical Psychologist, Dr. Hillary Goldsher.

Dr. Goldsher’s journey to becoming a psychologist was an unusual one. In 1998, She graduated from Kellogg school of management with an MBA in Business and worked for over 10 years in a fortune 500 medical supply corporation. There, she worked in sales, marketing and ultimately management where she participated in the positioning and selling of complex medical devices. Dr. Goldsher was very successful in this arena but always felt a pull towards the world of helping others. After a decade in the business world, she could no longer deny this pull and began her pursuit of a doctorate in clinical psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology. She now runs her own business as a Clinical Psychologist in the heart of Beverly Hills, CA

Dr. Goldsher specializes in the treatment of trauma/PTSD, depression/anxiety, couples, family, and parenting.

She also works with clients grappling with issues related to the corporate environment due to her extensive experience in the business world. She regularly assists people with the navigation of issues related to conflict, corporate culture and workplace dynamics.

Outside of her practice, Dr. Goldsher also serves the parenting community in her capacity as a psychologist through a Los Angeles based company called Sleepy Planet. She runs weekly parenting groups and sees private clients in a consulting role. The private consultations consist of parents or families seeking help to address conflict, divorce and dysfunctional family dynamics.Dr. Goldsher has secured a position as an expert in the psychology community. She appears regularly on various TV outlets including Fox, CNN, and other local news outlets to offer her opinion on her various areas of expertise. She recently appeared on Dr. Drew’s podcast to discuss topics ranging from trauma, eating disorders, bullying and the psychological ramifications of social media. She is regularly asked to contribute to various publications to offer her expertise and can be found in the virtual pages of self.comyahoo.comfoxnews.com and others.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

Ibegan my professional journey in the business world. I worked for a fortune 500 healthcare company in sales and marketing for years. I enjoyed financial and professional success early and often in that arena. However, there was always a silent pull inside of me towards something else — something bigger than myself. For years, I ignored or suppressed this pull. Over time, I could no longer deny my heart. I felt called to help others in the arena of mental health. I wanted to serve the community and the country by supporting those struggling with mental health issues. I was compelled to earn the privilege to educate individuals and the public about taking care of the mind and the heart in order to live a life of love, connection and peace.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you began leading your company?

I found it very compelling when my services and reach pivoted from solely taking care of individual clients to serving as an expert in various mediums to the general public. My appearances on TV, podcasts, radio and on the pages of a plethora of publications has allowed me to be a voice of support, guidance and education around individual and community mental health issues. Making an impact in this manner is humbling and life changing. Making an impact is why I do this work. Being able to do it on a broader scale is an honor and a part of the job I covet.

What makes your company stand out? Can you share a story?

My background is a compelling differentiator. It is atypical for a Doctor of Psychology to also hold an MBA from a top business school in the country. Quite organically, my private practice has evolved to include serving many clients who are seeking assistance in navigating the complex dynamics of the business world. My education and background render me uniquely qualified to guide such individuals. . Even though I pivoted from directly immersing myself in the business arena, that experience boldly expands my offering. This part of my journey underscores how all of our personal and professional experiences ultimately and deeply contribute to how we move through our lives and what we can offer to the world. One should always lean into all chapters of their unique stories.

Can you share with our readers about the innovations that you are bringing to the healthcare industry? How do you envision that this might disrupt the status quo? Which “pain point” is this trying to address?

My professional goals are multi layered. Bringing awareness to the myriad of mental health struggles that exist in our country is paramount. Mitigating shame around these struggles remains as important. Promoting a thorough and individualized treatment plan for those that are grappling with these issues is simply mandatory. At the core of this mandate is the notion of normalizing mental health conditions. I seek to assure, validate and guide those that are struggling and those that support those that are struggling. There is no room for shame or embarrassment. Mental health issues are akin to physical health issues. This paradigm should be widely promoted and understood. We wouldn’t blame or shame anyone who had a diagnosis of lupus for example. It is simply not their fault. The same is true for an individual who struggles with depression or anxiety or any serious mental health diagnosis. It is simply not their fault. Rather it is a complex intersection of biology, chemistry and psychological dynamics that take hold. However, mental health struggles can be treated and/or managed in a way that greatly reduces the level of suffering and the dysfunction. Those resources must be brought to bear for those who are suffering. Empirical data supports the success of various treatment approaches. Typically, the combination of therapy and where appropriate, psychotropic medication yields the best outcome. This is a disease that can be treated. Individuals should feel empowered to seek a diagnosis and treatment plan. This kind of awareness and empowerment should and could mitigate the ubiquitous and chronic pain point experienced by many individuals in this country who suffer from the oft debilitating symptoms of mental illness.

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why. (Please share a story or example for each.)

I don’t begrudge or regret learning curves. I think an important element of success is trying and failing, problem solving and trouble shooting. It’s really the only road to mastery. So while I don’t wish that my personal journey was different, there are many lessons I discovered along the way that are significant and relevant to professional success.

  • Anxiety is normal, expected and even useful

-It’s appropriate to experience anxiety when pursuing a new path. It is fraught with uncertainty and the unknown. It is human nature -not weakness- to feel complex emotions around a new endeavor. Embrace those feelings and deeply consider them normal. Allow them to fuel you to push through fears and move forward in spite of doubt or worry.

  • Success might not be immediate

-My practice didn’t reach capacity overnight. It required patience, networking, proving myself, and offering self-produced material and education to the public. Building a business is typically a marathon, not a sprint. Utilize all resources and keep your foot on the gas.

  • Be an Eternal Student

-To maintain passion focus and expertise, it is critical to pursue learning through continuing education and collaboration with colleagues and more. This pursuit will keep your interest and investment in your work active and updated.

  • Diversify

-Find ways to expand your areas of expertise and your audience. Not only did I establish a private practice in which I served clients, I also positioned myself as an expert in my areas of focus. This strategy netted me a platform in which I serve as an expert in various forms of media (tv, podcasts, written articles and more.)

  • Find your why

-To maintain energy, focus and passion it is critical to be deeply connected to why you do the work you do. I am deeply committed to helping people move through mental health struggles. It is my life’s work. This truth serves as a constant form of motivation and renewal.

Let’s jump to the main focus of our interview. According to this study cited by Newsweek, the US healthcare system is ranked as the worst among high income nations. This seems shocking. Can you share with us 3–5 reasons why you think the US is ranked so poorly?

  • A lack of access

-Treatment for mental health struggles is simply not available for most individuals in our country. If one lingers on this truth, it is heartbreaking and unfathomable. Millions of people suffer and are unable to pursue help due to financial constraints. The notion that such a wealthy country is unable to create a system where every American has access to healthcare when they are ill is unacceptable and must change. This truth is certainly one of the primary reasons the U.S. is ranked so poorly in terms of healthcare.

  • Absence of Long-Term Plan

-Those that can and do access mental health services through our health care system quickly discover that there is a cap on treatment. Some mental health care conditions require lifelong treatment. Most require treatment far beyond what insurance covers. Often, Individuals access help and then are cut off from additional services after an insufficient period of time. This systematic limitation does not lead to good outcomes for those with chronic mental health conditions.

  • Mental Health is Not a Priority

-Mental health is often not valued or prioritized in the same way as physical health. Yet it causes immense suffering for many individuals in our country. More robust programs and funding must be mobilized to support this pain point of our healthcare system.

You are a “healthcare insider”. Can you share 5 changes that need to be made to improve the overall US healthcare system? Please share a story or example for each.

  • Create a national program that provides mental health services for all individuals.
  • Categorize levels of need to allow for funding to follow those with the greatest needs through to the completion of their treatment
  • Implement a long term, national campaign that focuses on reducing shame and encouraging the pursuit of treatment for those struggling with mental health issues
  • Enhance transparency so the average citizen can understand what resources are available to them
  • Create a resource “buddy” for every American. It could potentially be a digital resource. This reserve would guide every individual through a decision tree of resources when health care issues emerged. The current system does not allow for easy navigation. Thus, treatment sources are overlooked or misunderstood.

Thank you! It’s great to suggest changes, but what specific steps would need to be taken to implement your ideas? What can individuals, corporations, communities and leaders do to help?

This kind of healthcare overhaul would need support at all levels of our healthcare system. Advocacy has to occur at the individual level. State and federal legislation must be enacted after a think tank of experts and end users vet out the most effective solutions. Funding will need to be mobilized from public and private sectors. Community, state and national experts should launch a collaborative campaign that deeply educates the public about the costs of untreated mental health conditions. Personal well-being, professional productivity and lives are lost to mental health struggles every day. A robust system that provides support and treatment would reduce those tangible, quantifiable and devastating losses.

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