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“5 Things Retirees Say They Wish They Were Told”, with Dr. Christopher V. Kimball and Beau Henderson

Asa part of my series about the “5 Things Retirees Say They Wish They Were Told Before They Began Retirement” I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Christopher V Kimball . Dr. Christopher V. Kimball graduated from the University of Washington, is a Certified Financial Planner practitioner, author, and has been in the financial services […]

Asa part of my series about the “5 Things Retirees Say They Wish They Were Told Before They Began Retirement” I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Christopher V Kimball . Dr. Christopher V. Kimball graduated from the University of Washington, is a Certified Financial Planner practitioner, author, and has been in the financial services business for over 26 years. He is a life and qualifying member of the Million Dollar Roundtable, has four industry designations, 3 master’s degrees, and has received numerous industry awards. Kimball is a member and past president of the local Rotary club, enjoys classic cars, motorcycles, music, and founded Woodstick — breaking the world record of drummers drumming to raise money for charity. He and his wife, Vicki, have two wonderful sons.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the backstory about what brought you to your specific career path?

Over the years, my career path seemed very eclectic and disjointed. Working in electronics sales, touring the Country in bands (the drummer), employed in the advertising industry, and even a stint as a church youth director, all worked together to prepare me for my career in financial services. Being able to work with people, utilizing sales skills, and knowing how to market my business are all key in what allowed me to achieve success in helping people with their financial planning and investments. The opportunity to work in this field happened almost accidentally. My wife’s aunt Barbara had worked for Prudential for 30 years and suggested I look into financial services. Almost as a lark I took the tests to see if I could qualify. Sure enough I did, and the rest, as they say, is history! A little over 8 years ago I left Prudential and went independent with a company called Money Concepts LLC. That was a great move, and I’ve had my best career years ever since joining Money Concepts.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

The most interesting relates to my joining Rotary. As a business owner it seemed a good thing to do. Once involved I learned about their drive to eliminate Polio from the world. They asked for suggestions for a fund-raiser, and I thought it would be fun to try and break the Guinness World Record for drummers simultaneously playing drum sets. Long story short, in 2003 we assembled 264 drummers at a local airport and beat our way into the record books! It became an annual event, and with the help of local drum-store owner Donn Bennett, we broke the record twice more, the largest number in 2006 when, at the Seattle Qwest Events Center, we gathered 534 drummers! Each year celebrity drummers showed up to help, and over the years we raised tens of thousands of dollars for Rotary and other non-profit organizations. Through Woodstick (what else could I call it??) I not only met hundreds of wonderful people, I also garnered several wonderful new clients.

Can you share a story with us about the most humorous mistake you made when you were first starting? What lesson or take-away did you learn from that?

I’ve had many wonderful experiences since I started in this career over 26 years ago. Some, of course, weren’t so wonderful.

Perhaps the funniest story happened during my early years. I used to drive to people’s homes for appointments. On one dark and dreary evening I drove about 35 miles out in the country trying to find the right house. I remember heading down a long, pothole-filled road only to end up at a dead end. Frustrated, and not wanting to be late to the appointment, I turned around and began driving back the way I came at a rather rapid rate. Unfortunately, I came upon a slow-moving pickup truck and was forced to a crawl. That increased my frustration, and unable to pass the truck I began to tailgate him in a very rude and unprofessional way. In an example of “what goes around comes around,” as I finally reached my destination the truck pulled into the driveway — the driver was one of the people I was supposed to meet! He got out of the truck, glared at me, and headed into the home. Now, when I say “home” I’m being generous. It was a run-down mobile home with only about two walls inside. Most of the furniture was scattered about in a random fashion, and in one corner was a large TV with several young men loudly watching a football game. There was a small child running around and a dog or two, just to add to the cacophony. There I was, with my brand-new laptop computer and my suit, trying to act professional while all around me was chaos. During the presentation, the woman to whom I was talking took a pan of baked chicken out of the oven and began eating her dinner. The youngster grabbed a drumstick and proceeded to wipe it on my trouser leg. This caused the dog to begin licking my suit in a very inappropriate way. At that point I decided I should look for greener pastures. As I got up to leave, the woman rose to show me out. I’ll never forget what happened next; as she stood up (she was barefoot), she stepped right into a large pile of the present the dog had left on the floor. She slid a foot or two, barely maintaining her balance. At that point I came to the conclusion these people were not viable prospects…! I never heard from them again, much to my relief. What did I learn? To research a prospect before making an appointment!

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

When I first started, a manager showed me in the pages of a three-ring binder, a career path which showed certain actions resulting in certain financial rewards. After the first six-months in the business, however, I was becoming discouraged. Products were changing, commissions and fees were decreasing, and I was not seeing the fruits of my labor I was promised. At that point, a new manager appeared on the scene. Rick Cederberg was a many-faceted individual. Although a lot less conservative than I was, he nevertheless possessed a quality which made each person with whom he interacted feel as though he or she was the most important person in the room. In short — he was inspiring. He was also the one who told me honestly how difficult the first few years of a financial-services career could be. I appreciated his candor, and was encouraged enough to keep trying. What he said I should expect is exactly what happened. My income doubled the year he arrived on the scene, then doubled again, and again. I haven’t seen Rick in a long time, but I still appreciate that he was the right person in the right place at the right time to launch me in the right direction.

What advice would you suggest to your colleagues in your industry to thrive and avoid burnout?

Attend conferences, associate with successful individuals in one’s field, and don’t be afraid to approach the top producers

and ask them questions.

What advice would you give to other leaders about how to create a fantastic work culture?

Stay optimistic, but realistic. Don’t gloss over problems, but show those who follow you you appreciate them and are willing

to take them with you to success.

Ok thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. Retirement is a dramatic ‘life course transition’ that can impact nearly every aspect of one’s life. Obviously everyone’s experience is different. But In your experience, what are the 5 most common things that people wish someone told them before they retired?

1) save more when you’re younger

2) live understanding the concept of delayed gratification

3) take more risks

4) have a purpose in life beyond your profession

5) spend more time with your family

Lets zoom in on this a bit. If you had to advise your loved ones about the 3 most important financial issues to keep in mind before they retire, what would you say? Can you give an example or share a story?

1) be realistic about your expenses; don’t underestimate how much you’ll need

2) if you have enough money during retirement, move your investments to a more conservative mix

3) do planning with a qualified elder-law attorney

I see examples of spending mistakes quite often. The most frequent is the “we’re going to move into a smaller house” myth. Instead of downsizing and investing some of the proceeds from the sale of the larger home, people buy a smaller home which is newer and just as expensive as their last house, and moving costs and other expenditures associated with moving to a new home can often end up draining resources — the opposite of what was supposed to happen.

If you had to advise your loved ones about the 3 most important health issues to keep in mind before they retire, what would you say? Can you give an example or share a story?

1) stay active physically

2) stay active mentally (this helps physicality, too)

3) stay active spiritually (see #2)

If you had to advise your loved ones about the 3 most important things to consider before choosing a place to live after they retire, what would you say? Can you give an example or share a story?

1) does it offer a good social environment?

2) does it offer continuing care options?

3) is it close to friends or family who can offer help if needed?

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

From a financial perspective, capitalism has brought the most opportunity to the most people. I would continue to promote worthy commerce and enterprise.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story?

Besides the Bible (the most published book in the world), CS Lewis’ writings have always been inspiring. Of course, “The Saga of Ike and Penny; a Couple’s Humorous Journey Through the Confusing World of Finance” is a wonderful read (of course I would say that; I wrote it! :))

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

“Good enough is rarely good.” This comes from an old calendar once owned by my English grandparents. It was made of Bakelite and was given to me from my mom. There were 31 sayings, one for each day of the month. We heard them growing up over and over again! I can probably rattle off almost all of them if the need arises.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

My Christopher Kimball Financial Services

Facebook page, or my personal Facebook page.

Asa part of my series about the “5 Things Retirees Say They Wish They Were Told Before They Began Retirement” I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Christopher V Kimball . Dr. Christopher V. Kimball graduated from the University of Washington, is a Certified Financial Planner practitioner, author, and has been in the financial services business for over 26 years. He is a life and qualifying member of the Million Dollar Roundtable, has four industry designations, 3 master’s degrees, and has received numerous industry awards. Kimball is a member and past president of the local Rotary club, enjoys classic cars, motorcycles, music, and founded Woodstick — breaking the world record of drummers drumming to raise money for charity. He and his wife, Vicki, have two wonderful sons.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the backstory about what brought you to your specific career path?

Over the years, my career path seemed very eclectic and disjointed. Working in electronics sales, touring the Country in bands (the drummer), employed in the advertising industry, and even a stint as a church youth director, all worked together to prepare me for my career in financial services. Being able to work with people, utilizing sales skills, and knowing how to market my business are all key in what allowed me to achieve success in helping people with their financial planning and investments. The opportunity to work in this field happened almost accidentally. My wife’s aunt Barbara had worked for Prudential for 30 years and suggested I look into financial services. Almost as a lark I took the tests to see if I could qualify. Sure enough I did, and the rest, as they say, is history! A little over 8 years ago I left Prudential and went independent with a company called Money Concepts LLC. That was a great move, and I’ve had my best career years ever since joining Money Concepts.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

The most interesting relates to my joining Rotary. As a business owner it seemed a good thing to do. Once involved I learned about their drive to eliminate Polio from the world. They asked for suggestions for a fund-raiser, and I thought it would be fun to try and break the Guinness World Record for drummers simultaneously playing drum sets. Long story short, in 2003 we assembled 264 drummers at a local airport and beat our way into the record books! It became an annual event, and with the help of local drum-store owner Donn Bennett, we broke the record twice more, the largest number in 2006 when, at the Seattle Qwest Events Center, we gathered 534 drummers! Each year celebrity drummers showed up to help, and over the years we raised tens of thousands of dollars for Rotary and other non-profit organizations. Through Woodstick (what else could I call it??) I not only met hundreds of wonderful people, I also garnered several wonderful new clients.

Can you share a story with us about the most humorous mistake you made when you were first starting? What lesson or take-away did you learn from that?

I’ve had many wonderful experiences since I started in this career over 26 years ago. Some, of course, weren’t so wonderful.

Perhaps the funniest story happened during my early years. I used to drive to people’s homes for appointments. On one dark and dreary evening I drove about 35 miles out in the country trying to find the right house. I remember heading down a long, pothole-filled road only to end up at a dead end. Frustrated, and not wanting to be late to the appointment, I turned around and began driving back the way I came at a rather rapid rate. Unfortunately, I came upon a slow-moving pickup truck and was forced to a crawl. That increased my frustration, and unable to pass the truck I began to tailgate him in a very rude and unprofessional way. In an example of “what goes around comes around,” as I finally reached my destination the truck pulled into the driveway — the driver was one of the people I was supposed to meet! He got out of the truck, glared at me, and headed into the home. Now, when I say “home” I’m being generous. It was a run-down mobile home with only about two walls inside. Most of the furniture was scattered about in a random fashion, and in one corner was a large TV with several young men loudly watching a football game. There was a small child running around and a dog or two, just to add to the cacophony. There I was, with my brand-new laptop computer and my suit, trying to act professional while all around me was chaos. During the presentation, the woman to whom I was talking took a pan of baked chicken out of the oven and began eating her dinner. The youngster grabbed a drumstick and proceeded to wipe it on my trouser leg. This caused the dog to begin licking my suit in a very inappropriate way. At that point I decided I should look for greener pastures. As I got up to leave, the woman rose to show me out. I’ll never forget what happened next; as she stood up (she was barefoot), she stepped right into a large pile of the present the dog had left on the floor. She slid a foot or two, barely maintaining her balance. At that point I came to the conclusion these people were not viable prospects…! I never heard from them again, much to my relief. What did I learn? To research a prospect before making an appointment!

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

When I first started, a manager showed me in the pages of a three-ring binder, a career path which showed certain actions resulting in certain financial rewards. After the first six-months in the business, however, I was becoming discouraged. Products were changing, commissions and fees were decreasing, and I was not seeing the fruits of my labor I was promised. At that point, a new manager appeared on the scene. Rick Cederberg was a many-faceted individual. Although a lot less conservative than I was, he nevertheless possessed a quality which made each person with whom he interacted feel as though he or she was the most important person in the room. In short — he was inspiring. He was also the one who told me honestly how difficult the first few years of a financial-services career could be. I appreciated his candor, and was encouraged enough to keep trying. What he said I should expect is exactly what happened. My income doubled the year he arrived on the scene, then doubled again, and again. I haven’t seen Rick in a long time, but I still appreciate that he was the right person in the right place at the right time to launch me in the right direction.

What advice would you suggest to your colleagues in your industry to thrive and avoid burnout?

Attend conferences, associate with successful individuals in one’s field, and don’t be afraid to approach the top producers

and ask them questions.

What advice would you give to other leaders about how to create a fantastic work culture?

Stay optimistic, but realistic. Don’t gloss over problems, but show those who follow you you appreciate them and are willing

to take them with you to success.

Ok thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. Retirement is a dramatic ‘life course transition’ that can impact nearly every aspect of one’s life. Obviously everyone’s experience is different. But In your experience, what are the 5 most common things that people wish someone told them before they retired?

1) save more when you’re younger

2) live understanding the concept of delayed gratification

3) take more risks

4) have a purpose in life beyond your profession

5) spend more time with your family

Lets zoom in on this a bit. If you had to advise your loved ones about the 3 most important financial issues to keep in mind before they retire, what would you say? Can you give an example or share a story?

1) be realistic about your expenses; don’t underestimate how much you’ll need

2) if you have enough money during retirement, move your investments to a more conservative mix

3) do planning with a qualified elder-law attorney

I see examples of spending mistakes quite often. The most frequent is the “we’re going to move into a smaller house” myth. Instead of downsizing and investing some of the proceeds from the sale of the larger home, people buy a smaller home which is newer and just as expensive as their last house, and moving costs and other expenditures associated with moving to a new home can often end up draining resources — the opposite of what was supposed to happen.

If you had to advise your loved ones about the 3 most important health issues to keep in mind before they retire, what would you say? Can you give an example or share a story?

1) stay active physically

2) stay active mentally (this helps physicality, too)

3) stay active spiritually (see #2)

If you had to advise your loved ones about the 3 most important things to consider before choosing a place to live after they retire, what would you say? Can you give an example or share a story?

1) does it offer a good social environment?

2) does it offer continuing care options?

3) is it close to friends or family who can offer help if needed?

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

From a financial perspective, capitalism has brought the most opportunity to the most people. I would continue to promote worthy commerce and enterprise.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story?

Besides the Bible (the most published book in the world), CS Lewis’ writings have always been inspiring. Of course, “The Saga of Ike and Penny; a Couple’s Humorous Journey Through the Confusing World of Finance” is a wonderful read (of course I would say that; I wrote it! :))

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

“Good enough is rarely good.” This comes from an old calendar once owned by my English grandparents. It was made of Bakelite and was given to me from my mom. There were 31 sayings, one for each day of the month. We heard them growing up over and over again! I can probably rattle off almost all of them if the need arises.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

My Christopher Kimball Financial Services

Facebook page, or my personal Facebook page.

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We wish you only continued success in your great work!

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We wish you only continued success in your great work!

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