5 takeaways from my manager’s advice.

At the time of joining one of the previous companies, I and one more person were the only freshers in the team. It was back in 2007 and we were relatively new to the corporate world. In the initial days, it was a quite jovial environment and my team members were really supportive.Within two months […]

Thrive invites voices from many spheres to share their perspectives on our Community platform. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and opinions expressed by Community contributors do not reflect the opinions of Thrive or its employees. More information on our Community guidelines is available here.

At the time of joining one of the previous companies, I and one more person were the only freshers in the team.

It was back in 2007 and we were relatively new to the corporate world.

In the initial days, it was a quite jovial environment and my team members were really supportive.

Within two months of my joining, three of the senior team members resigned in order to pursue better opportunities.

Being relatively new to the team, we were worried about how to manage the work in the future.

At that time we had a meeting with our Manager to discuss the plan of action.

I raised the concern that the work might get affected badly as experienced members are leaving the team.

My manager calmly replied that no process is dependent on an individual and it’s not rocket science.

Two weeks later, all the senior colleagues left and a couple of freshers joined the team.

As there was no other option left, I was the person who delivered the training to the new team members

Within a couple of weeks, things started to fall in place, it was business as usual and the work went smoothly as before.

The 5 takeaways from this experience were

1. When your bosses speak out of their personal experience, it matters a lot.

2. When the senior members of your team leaves the organisation, it’s actually an opportunity to learn new things and grow further.

3. No work or process is dependent on an individual.

4. You may remember and appreciate the work of your ex-colleague for a day or two, but not more than that.

5. You might have an emotional bonding towards a colleague, but it’s not necessary that the relationship lasts even after he or she leaves the organisation.


Do you have any similar experience where a piece of advice turned out to be eye-opener? Please share your thoughts

You might also like...

Community//

Alison Lindland On How We Need To Adjust To The Future Of Work

by Karen Mangia
Community//

Mamie Kanfer Stewart On How We Need To Adjust To The Future Of Work

by Karen Mangia
Community//

Eileen Szymanski Chen Of Rastaclat: “Family is first, never forget that”

by Jerome Knyszewski
We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.