Community//

5 Symptoms of Too Much Stress

1. Acne Acne is one of the most visible ways that stress often manifests itself. When some people are feeling stressed out, they tend to touch their faces more often. This can spread bacteria and contribute to the development of acne. Several studies have also confirmed that acne may be associated with higher levels of stress. […]

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1. Acne

Acne is one of the most visible ways that stress often manifests itself.

When some people are feeling stressed out, they tend to touch their faces more often. This can spread bacteria and contribute to the development of acne. Several studies have also confirmed that acne may be associated with higher levels of stress. One study measured acne severity in 22 people before and during an exam. Increased levels of stress as a result of the exam were associated with greater acne severity. Another study of 94 teenagers found that higher stress levels were associated with worse acne, especially in boys these studies show an association, but don’t account for other factors that may be involved. Further research is needed to look at the connection between acne and stress. In addition to stress, other potential causes of acne include hormonal shifts, bacteria, excess oil production and blocked pores.

2. Headaches

Many studies have found that stress can contribute to headaches, a condition characterized by pain in the head or neck region. One study of 267 people with chronic headaches found that a stressful event preceded the development of chronic headaches in about 45% of cases A larger study showed that increased stress intensity was associated with an increase in the number of headache days experienced per month Another study surveyed 150 military service members at a headache clinic, finding that 67%reportedtheirheadaches were triggered by stress, making it the second most common headache trigger. Other common headache triggers include lack of sleep, alcohol consumption and dehydration.

3. Chronic Pain

Aches and pains are a common complaint that can result from increased levels of stress. One study made up of 37 teenagers with sickle cell disease found that higher levels of daily stress were associated with increases in same-day pain levels .Other studies have shown that increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol may be associated with chronic pain. For example, one study compared 16 people with chronic back pain to a control group. It found that those with chronic pain had higher levels of cortisol .Another study showed that people with chronic pain had higher levels of cortisol in their hair, an indicator of prolonged stress .Keep in mind that these studies show an association but don’t look at other factors that may be involved. Furthermore, it’s unclear if stress contributes to chronic pain or vice versa, or if there’s another factor that causes both. Besides stress, there are many other factors that can contribute to chronic pain, including conditions such as aging, injuries, poor posture and nerve damage.

4. Frequent Sickness

If you feel like you’re constantly battling a case of the sniffles, stress may be to blame. Stress may take a toll on your immune system and can cause increased susceptibility to infections. In one study, 61 older adults were injected with the flu vaccine. Those with chronic stress were found to have a weakened immune response to the vaccine, indicating that stress may be associated with decreased immunity. In another study, 235 adults were categorized into either a high- or low-stress group. Over a six-month period, those in the high-stress group experienced 70% more respiratory infections and had nearly 61% more days of symptoms than the low-stress group Similarly, one analysis looking at 27 studies showed that stress was linked to increased susceptibility of developing an upper respiratory infection. More research on humans is needed to understand the complex connection between stress and immunity. However, stress is just one piece of the puzzle when it comes to immune health. A weakened immune system can also be the result of a poor diet, physical inactivity and certain immunodeficiency disorders like leukemia and multiple myeloma.

5. Decreased Energy and Insomnia

Chronic fatigue and decreased energy levels can also be caused by prolonged stress. For example, one study of 2,483 people found that fatigue was strongly associated with increased stress levels .Stress may also disrupt sleep and cause insomnia, which can lead to low energy. One small study found that higher levels of work-related stress were associated with increased sleepiness and restlessness at bedtime. Another study of 2,316 participants showed that experiencing a higher number of stressful events was significantly associated with an increased risk of insomnia .These studies show an association, but they don’t account for other factors that may have played a role. Further research is needed to determine if stress can directly cause decreased energy levels. Other factors that may play a role in decreased energy levels include dehydration, low blood sugar, a poor diet or an underactive thyroid.

Acne is one of the most visible ways that stress often manifests itself.

When some people are feeling stressed out, they tend to touch their faces more often. This can spread bacteria and contribute to the development of acne. Several studies have also confirmed that acne may be associated with higher levels of stress. One study measured acne severity in 22 people before and during an exam. Increased levels of stress as a result of the exam were associated with greater acne severity. Another study of 94 teenagers found that higher stress levels were associated with worse acne, especially in boys these studies show an association, but don’t account for other factors that may be involved. Further research is needed to look at the connection between acne and stress. In addition to stress, other potential causes of acne include hormonal shifts, bacteria, excess oil production and blocked pores.

2. Headaches

Many studies have found that stress can contribute to headaches, a condition characterized by pain in the head or neck region. One study of 267 people with chronic headaches found that a stressful event preceded the development of chronic headaches in about 45% of cases A larger study showed that increased stress intensity was associated with an increase in the number of headache days experienced per month Another study surveyed 150 military service members at a headache clinic, finding that 67%reportedtheirheadaches were triggered by stress, making it the second most common headache trigger. Other common headache triggers include lack of sleep, alcohol consumption and dehydration.

3. Chronic Pain

Aches and pains are a common complaint that can result from increased levels of stress. One study made up of 37 teenagers with sickle cell disease found that higher levels of daily stress were associated with increases in same-day pain levels .Other studies have shown that increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol may be associated with chronic pain. For example, one study compared 16 people with chronic back pain to a control group. It found that those with chronic pain had higher levels of cortisol .Another study showed that people with chronic pain had higher levels of cortisol in their hair, an indicator of prolonged stress .Keep in mind that these studies show an association but don’t look at other factors that may be involved. Furthermore, it’s unclear if stress contributes to chronic pain or vice versa, or if there’s another factor that causes both. Besides stress, there are many other factors that can contribute to chronic pain, including conditions such as aging, injuries, poor posture and nerve damage.

4. Frequent Sickness

If you feel like you’re constantly battling a case of the sniffles, stress may be to blame. Stress may take a toll on your immune system and can cause increased susceptibility to infections. In one study, 61 older adults were injected with the flu vaccine. Those with chronic stress were found to have a weakened immune response to the vaccine, indicating that stress may be associated with decreased immunity. In another study, 235 adults were categorized into either a high- or low-stress group. Over a six-month period, those in the high-stress group experienced 70% more respiratory infections and had nearly 61% more days of symptoms than the low-stress group Similarly, one analysis looking at 27 studies showed that stress was linked to increased susceptibility of developing an upper respiratory infection. More research on humans is needed to understand the complex connection between stress and immunity. However, stress is just one piece of the puzzle when it comes to immune health. A weakened immune system can also be the result of a poor diet, physical inactivity and certain immunodeficiency disorders like leukemia and multiple myeloma.

5. Decreased Energy and Insomnia

Chronic fatigue and decreased energy levels can also be caused by prolonged stress. For example, one study of 2,483 people found that fatigue was strongly associated with increased stress levels .Stress may also disrupt sleep and cause insomnia, which can lead to low energy. One small study found that higher levels of work-related stress were associated with increased sleepiness and restlessness at bedtime. Another study of 2,316 participants showed that experiencing a higher number of stressful events was significantly associated with an increased risk of insomnia .These studies show an association, but they don’t account for other factors that may have played a role. Further research is needed to determine if stress can directly cause decreased energy levels. Other factors that may play a role in decreased energy levels include dehydration, low blood sugar, a poor diet or an underactive thyroid.

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