5 Apps to Relax and Get Over Anxiety During Quarantine

No one can deny the fact that the coronavirus disease or Covid-19 pandemic has had a major effect on everyone’s lives. The thing is, this pandemic doesn’t only affect your livelihood and socialization, it also has a great impact on your mental health. You see, public health actions such as social distancing, while it is […]

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No one can deny the fact that the coronavirus disease or Covid-19 pandemic has had a major effect on everyone’s lives. The thing is, this pandemic doesn’t only affect your livelihood and socialization, it also has a great impact on your mental health.

You see, public health actions such as social distancing, while it is necessary to reduce the spread of Covid-19, it also makes everyone feel isolated and lonely. Thus, increasing stress and anxiety.

How can your smartphone help you relax and reduce anxiety?

Your smartphone doesn’t have to be a source of your anxiety. In fact, mobile phones are one of the helpful tools available to address your self-care needs.

Mobile phones are one of the helpful tools available to address your self-care needs. (Photo credit: post.healthline.com)

The following are some of the mental health apps you can download on your smartphone to help you manage your coronavirus anxiety. These apps can be used on a brand new mobile phone or on unlocked and refurbished iPhones and Android devices.

  • Wysa. It is ideal for you to have a loved one or a mental health professional to talk to. However, you should keep in mind that not all the time they are available for conversation. That’s why Wysa is there to help you better manage your mental health.

    Wysa is a mental health chatbot that uses therapy-based practices and activities. These include cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, mindfulness, mood tracking, and others. This chatbot is a friendly AI coach who can help you navigate those difficult moments, such as staying up late at night or fending off a panic attack, whenever they come up.
  • BoosterBuddy. Referred to as one of the best mental health apps that is available for free. The BoosterBuddy is designed to help you get through your day, particularly if you are living with a mental health condition. The app was actually created with input from young adults living with mental illness.

    To use the app, simply check in with your “buddy” and complete three small tasks to help you build some momentum for the day. Upon completing these quests, you will earn coins that can be exchanged for rewards. These rewards will allow you to dress up your animal friend in a fanny pack, sunglasses, a tasteful scarf, and more.

    You can also have the access to an extensive glossary of different coping skills organized by condition, a journal, a medication alarm, a task manager, and more, all in one central app.
  • Shine. This app is perfect when you need some encouragement. Shine is best described as a self-care community that includes daily meditations, pep talks, articles, community discussions, among others. This app focuses on self-compassion and personal growth, making it a life coach that you can use everywhere you go.

    This app was actually created by two women of color. This means that you won’t get the hokey, appropriate woo stuff you might find in other apps. Shine’s guided meditations are equal parts powerful and accessible. The app uses everyday language and an uplifting tone to reach you.
  • #SelfCare. An app you can use when you need to calm down. The #SelfCare is the app you should reach for when you feel your anxiety starting to escalate. This app enables you to pretend that you are spending the day in bed. It uses soothing music, visuals, and activities to help ease you into a more restful state.

    With #SelfCare, you can decorate your space, draw a tarot card for inspiration, cuddle a cat, tend to an altar and plants, among others. The app also offers encouraging words and relaxing taks for you to have a moment of mindfulness and calm.
  • Talkspace. Do you need extra support? Talkspace is your go-to online therapy app. You see, online therapy is extremely important nowadays, especially with so many people doing self-isolation due to Covid-19. Keep in mind that there is no shame in reaching out for help when you find your life becoming unmanageable for whatever reason.
Mental health apps can help you fortify your mental health and build resilience during this critical time. (Photo credit: hips.hearstapps.com)

There are also other healthy ways you can cope with stress that doesn’t involve mobile apps. Here are some of them:

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including those on social media.
  • Take care of your body by meditating, eating health, well-balanced meals, getting plenty of sleep, avoiding excessive alcohol, tobacco, and substance use, and getting vaccinated with a Covid-19 vaccine when available.
  • Make time to unwind by doing activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others about your concerns and how you are feeling.
  • Connect with your community- or faith-based organizations through social media, by phone, or mail.

While a mental health app can be super useful, the fact remains that it cannot end the pandemic. Instead, it can help you fortify your mental health and build resilience during this critical time.

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