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Etan Moses: “Find people who you connect with on a deeper level than music”

The key seems to be finding genuine people to form a team that actually cares about you. Find people who you connect with on a deeper level than music. For me, that’s faith and belief in Jesus. Finding others who share in that vision has helped deepen our investment in each other. That transcends profit […]

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The key seems to be finding genuine people to form a team that actually cares about you. Find people who you connect with on a deeper level than music. For me, that’s faith and belief in Jesus. Finding others who share in that vision has helped deepen our investment in each other. That transcends profit and puts people as the forefront for our team. I received this advice, and because I’m so new, I’m following it and finding it to be such good advice.


As a part of our series about Nashville’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Etan Moses.

Etan Moses made her way to Nashville in 2019, with her husband and three children in tow. An Iowa native, Etan jumped onto the country music scene in 2020 with her single “Country Mile Love.” Massive support blossomed from her corn-bred roots, which keeps her grounded even as her career has taken off. Listen to Etan’s newest single “Thankful” on all streaming platforms.


Thank you so much for joining us in this series! Our readers would love to get to know you a bit better. Can you tell us a bit of the ‘backstory’ of how you grew up?

I was born and raised in Iowa. My family and I spent most of our days in small, rural towns. My parents worked incredibly hard to support us both financially and emotionally. They were the parents who sacrificed to be there for every thing we participated in. They made sure we were always loved and it never occurred to me until I was older that we didn’t have what the world called the “finer things” because our home always felt safe and full of everything we needed. I was involved in every club, sport and activity I could be in our small school (I think my high school had 140–160 people in the whole high school when I attended). We used to sing as a family at churches and events in our area. My parents made sure we grew up knowing the love of Jesus, and it’s something I try to pass on to my kids. I was the 4-H/ FFA fair queen of Poweshiek county. I was a creative kid/ adolescent that sometimes felt out of place but also so at home in our supportive small town. I went to a community college in Iowa to play basketball after high school, and, by some Divine intervention, I eventually ended up at Lee University in Cleveland, TN where I met my husband. After getting married, going overseas for a year and settling back in Iowa for a few years and a few children, we moved to Nashville.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

We came to Nashville to volunteer at a nonprofit and church for what we thought was two months. Here we stay, a year-and-a-half later and I’m in the music industry. It’s a wild in between, yet God opened doors, and I started writing and recording music with two producers, Wes Strunk and Nate Johnson in May of 2020. Now, I’m finding my stride writing music in different genres, singing and helping other artists find success through Artist LaunchKit.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

Though my career is new, I’m already finding incredible community and relationship in music. I found one of my best friends and mentors in Nashville, Lisa Hentrich, in a silo I rented for the launch party for my first single, “Country Mile Love.” If that isn’t symbolic for an Iowa FFA fair queen moving to a big city looking for her people, I don’t know what is.

Can you share with us an interesting story about living in Nashville?

In our first full year in Nashville, 2020, we had our son, weathered two tornados, endured a pandemic, survived an election year and an act of terrorism in Nashville. We feel deeply connected to Nashville after being through so much here.

Can you share with us a few of the best parts of living in Nashville? We’d love to hear some specific examples or stories about that.

For me the best part about Nashville has been the community. We love our church, The Belonging Company. My husband and I have been able to serve on their kid’s team, outreach team, and participated in the choir. We have made incredible, deep relationships with people. From new tires being on our truck when we returned from a trip to Iowa, to date nights being paid for and babysitting being provided by a group of amazing and talented twenty-somethings we know and love, we literally cannot get over how you can find amazing community if you’re looking and willing to go all-in with people.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I was so green that I didn’t know how co-writes went, and I went through the first several writes without eating anything for like six hours because I was too afraid to ask and no one else ate. I’m not someone who likes to skip meals. I remember being in the bathroom daydreaming about a cheeseburger. I definitely learned you have to bring ALL the snacks and drinks if you want to come up with creative content for that sustained period of time (at least I do).

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

My husband and my children, obviously play a big role. They care about the music. They get excited. My two daughters are old enough to understand that Spotify makes us money. They’re so sweet to say “Mom, let’s make some money today,” and request my song in the car to support us. It’s the most precious thing. I’m also grateful toward our families and hometown areas. They keep showing up with a wide array of help and support that is indescribable. That small-town spirit and close-knit family momentum can make a lot of dark times bright. Special thanks to all of the independent radio stations who play artists like me. My Iowa friends Steve Shettler at KBOE 104.9 and Doris Day at Kix 101.1 have invested in me.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I’m super excited for some future projects in sync.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

I’m still “starting,” so that portion is in progress. I’ll have to share my diary with you one day when I’m seasoned and remembering the early days. I still feel like a new parent in the throws on the sleepless nights. It’s glorious, but you don’t see the season with clear accuracy until it’s over.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

The key seems to be finding genuine people to form a team that actually cares about you. Find people who you connect with on a deeper level than music. For me, that’s faith and belief in Jesus. Finding others who share in that vision has helped deepen our investment in each other. That transcends profit and puts people as the forefront for our team. I received this advice, and because I’m so new, I’m following it and finding it to be such good advice.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

My social media numbers might not suggest I have enormous influence, yet, I’m a firm believer that the size of your influence is not dependent on the amount of people you have following you, but the value you place on the people you influence. I view each relationship from a vantage point of mutual influence. I think that might be the key for me. Inspiring a movement that promotes the need and importance of community and voices being important regardless of where society places people in hierarchy. That you are valued. You are needed, whether you are the followed or the follower. My faith in Jesus reminds me that even when I feel like nothing, He thinks I’m priceless.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Not that I always keep this, I just think it’s good advice. “Gracious words are like a honeycomb, sweetness to the soul and health to the body.” Proverbs 16:24 ESV.

It’s been incredible to see how when others and myself have used gracious words, how meaningful relationships have happened. How you feel better when you’re going through something when you use gracious words through it and see health come from it. The opposite can also be true.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Chip and Joanna Gaines. There is something about their humble nature, their senses of humor, their family that parallels with our little family. I would love to spend time on the farm with both of our families and soak up as much as I could in the lunch.

How can our readers follow you online?

You can find me on Instagram @etanmosesmusic, Facebook, etanmoses.com, Patreon.com/etanmoses, and Spotify.

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

Thank YOU. What a fantastic online publication you have. I enjoyed seeing the valuable resources and varied interests you cover.

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