21 Musical Instruments Around The World To Help You Relax

Playing musical instruments is known to have many benefits like improving memory, reasoning skills and attention span.

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Playing musical instruments is known to have many benefits like improving memory, reasoning skills and attention span.

But did you know that it can help you relax and alleviate stress as well?

Beautiful music produced on different instruments can help you achieve a deeper state of meditation or relaxation.

Well, LOUD BEATS has a complete list of instruments around the world which can definitely help you relax.

 1. Piano

Piano is one of the most popular musical instruments in the world.

It is a traditional French instrument which was invented by an Italian inventor named Bartolomeo Cristofori.

Playing the piano is known to help relieve stress and make you relax. It also impacts your brain in a positive way and aids in improving memory, speech and attention.

2. Bansuri

The Bansuri is an Indian flute which is made from a single hollow shaft of bamboo.

It is mostly used in Hindustani classical music and is very popular in many Indian cultures.

The Bansuri is very effective at relaxing your mind and body because of its sweet sound.

3. Buzuk

The Buzuk is an Arabic instrument which resembles a long necked lute.

The original Buzuk has two courses of metal strings but today many of them have three courses.

It is a unique instrument since the musical pieces which are difficult to play on western instruments can be easily played on this one.

It can be used to create beautiful, deep and expressive melodies.

4. Oud

Oud is a fretless, stringed and Moroccan instrument which originated in the Middle East.

It is popularly known as the backbone of Arabic music.

This ancient string instrument originally had 4 strings but the modern Oud has six courses of double strings.

5. Sitar

The Sitar is a famous Indian musical instrument which is often used in Hindustani classical music.

A sitar is usually constructed from teak wood or mahogany and has 18-21 strings. Some strings run over curved raised frets while some run underneath.

It has a very distinctive sound which is sweet, melodious and relaxing.

6. Harp

The Harp is a traditional French instrument which has a number of individual strings attached at an angle to its soundboard.

Each string has a different frequency and produces one note. The longer the string, the lower the pitch.

Initially harps were widely used in the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East.

Some of the famous music pieces written for the harp include ‘Spanish Dance’ by De Falla and ‘Watching the Wheat’ by John Thomas.

7. German Lute

The German Lute is popularly known as the national instrument of Germany along with the Waldzither.

It is a stringed instrument which has a deep round back enclosing a hollow cavity. It also has a functional bridge like the guitar.

The German Lute is known for its rich, bass sound and beautiful construction.

8. Cuatro

The Jamaican instrument Cuatro belongs to the family of Latin American string instruments.

It resembles a small guitar with 4-5 strings and is often used in Caribbean music.

It is usually the lead instrument in folk music composed by the rural farmers and village folks in areas like Venezuela, Trinidad, Columbia and Tobago.

9. Chakhe

The Chakhe is a fretted instrument which is used in Thai music.

The ancient Chakhe was made in the shape of a crocodile but now this instrument has a more modern construction.

It consists of eleven wooden frets and a carved bridge.

10. Pan Flute

Also known as Syrinx, this instrument is widely used in Latin music.

The construction includes a combination of pipes which gradually increases in length.

The pan flute got its name from the Greek god Pan, who is usually depicted holding this particular instrument.

11. Ukulele

This Hawaiian instrument is becoming increasingly popular all over the world because of its compact size and lovely sound.

The Ukulele was originally used to play traditional Hawaiian music at formal royal functions but now it is used to play all kinds of songs.

It is rumoured that the local Hawaiians called this instrument ‘Jumping Flea’ because of the way the fingers moved on the fretboard.

12. Quena

This is a Peruvian wind instrument which originated in Latin America.

It is usually constructed from cane or wood and has 6 finger holes with 1 thumb hole. The Andeans often associate the Quena with the fertility rituals of resurrection and life.

It has a beautiful sound which is quite distinctive and unique.

13. Lyre

The Lyre is one of the popular stringed instruments of the Roman era.

It resembles a small U-shaped harp with strings running from a tailpiece on the bottom to the top. It has 4-10 strings and is said to be played by ancient Greeks.

Lyres have a nice, sweet and mellow sound which is quite relaxing to listen to.

14. Dan Nguyet

The Dan Nguyet is a traditional Vietnamese instrument which is often used in folk and classical music.

It has two strings and resembles a moon shaped lute. The string of the ancient Dan Nguyet were made from silk but today they are usually made from nylon.

15. Ney

This Egyptian instrument is considered to be one of the oldest instruments ever played.

The Ney is an end blown flute and consists of a hollow cane  with 5-6 finger holes and 1 thumb hole.

It is widely used in Islamic prayer and worship.

16. Daegeum

Daegeum is a traditional Korean instrument which is often played in classical and aristocratic music.

It is a large bamboo flute with a mouthpiece opening and 6 finger holes.

It has an aperture covered with a reed membrane. This gives the Daegyum a unique and distinctive sound.

17. Tres

This Cuban instrument resembles a guitar and was originally introduced in Guantanamo.

The original Tres is a three course chordophone with six strings. It has a classic guitar bridge with a tailpiece.

18. Violin

This Mexican instrument is one of the most popular and recognized ones in the world.

The violin is extremely versatile and can play a wide variety of music styles.

It is famous in western classical tradition and is used in many non-western cultures as well.

19. Shakuhachi

The Shakuhachi is a Japanese instrument which is an end blown bamboo flute.

It usually has 4 finger holes with a thumb hole. It is traditionally used for Buddhist meditation and prayer by Buddhist monks.

It is a versatile instrument and can be used to play a wide range of notes.

20. Flamenco Guitar

This is one of the most popular instruments in Spain.

The guitar body is usually constructed from cypress, spruce, rosewood or cedar.

This guitar has a thinner top and less internal bracing compared to a traditional guitar.

21. Scheitholz

The Scheitholz is a German instrument which is considered to be the oldest form of Drone zither. It is called the ancestor of the modern zither.

This instrument is also called ‘hummel’ in some parts of Germany. This is because of the humming sound of its drone strings.

Conclusion

If you feel inspired to learn to play any of the above instruments, go ahead and challenge yourself! Make sure you go for one which you genuinely want to learn even if it requires some effort.

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