20 Ways Not to Talk to Your Teenage Daughter

How to Strengthen Your Mother-Teenage Girl Relationship

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Teenage girls are sensitive to the way people in authority talk to them, especially their mothers.

They are easily wounded, feel criticized, and vulnerable when they sense or get outright disapproval. Even the most devoted mothers hear their girls say, “You don’t understand me.” So, let’s look at what not to say!

20 Sentences to Avoid When Mothers Talk to Their Daughters

  1. “You are such a disappointment.”
  2. “Don’t you ever listen?”
  3. “Fix your hair.”
  4. “Are you really going to wear that?”
  5. “Who were you on the phone with?”
  6. “When are you going to talk to that teacher?”
  7. “Get it together.”
  8. “That’s a terrible habit. Stop biting your nails.”
  9. “Give it up. Just apologize!”
  10. “You’re too sensitive.”
  11. “Mothers are people, too.”
  12.  “Clean your room.”
  13.  “Finish your college essays.”
  14.  “Let me read your college essays.”
  15. “Watch what you eat.”
  16. “Play with your brother.”
  17.  “Keep your hands off your face.”
  18.  “Don’t you ever think?”
  19. “Now you’ve done it.”
  20. “It’s really for your own good.”

Each teenage girl is actually different. They all go through stages in their own specific and unique ways and need to know you know that. Being different is good. Who needs ordinary and acceptable?

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