Leave behind those impossible goals and the stress that surrounds them.
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81% of women surveyed agree that people judge women on their skin.
84% of women 18 to 50 say society puts pressure on women to have “flawless” skin.
87% of women say they wish women didn’t feel so much pressure to follow rules about how their skin should look.

Source: Gillette Venus online survey of 1,076 North American women ages 18 to 50

81% of women surveyed agree that people judge women on their skin.
84% of women 18 to 50 say society puts pressure on women to have “flawless” skin.
87% of women say they wish women didn’t feel so much pressure to follow rules about how their skin should look.

Source: Gillette Venus online survey of 1,076 North American women ages 18 to 50

By Thrive Global Studios
Microstep
Take a risk and own it.

Sometimes self-care isn’t about a nice bath or a massage — it’s about facing a real fear and overcoming it. Wear that outfit you’ve been stressing about. Take off your cover-up at the swimming pool. Put yourself out there. It’s never as bad as you think it’s going to be.

Let yourself off the hook.

Choose one area of your life where you are allowed to be just OK, or even less than OK! Maybe you don’t need to exercise relentlessly. Maybe your house doesn’t need to be spotless. When you embrace imperfection, you’ll reduce your stress and have one less reason to judge yourself.

Let yourself cry.

Crying can be a cathartic way to acknowledge your emotions. Let the tears flow without judgment, and take it as an opportunity to examine your feelings.

Take a risk and own it.

Sometimes self-care isn’t about a nice bath or a massage — it’s about facing a real fear and overcoming it. Wear that outfit you’ve been stressing about. Take off your cover-up at the swimming pool. Put yourself out there. It’s never as bad as you think it’s going to be.

Let yourself off the hook.

Choose one area of your life where you are allowed to be just OK, or even less than OK! Maybe you don’t need to exercise relentlessly. Maybe your house doesn’t need to be spotless. When you embrace imperfection, you’ll reduce your stress and have one less reason to judge yourself.

Let yourself cry.

Crying can be a cathartic way to acknowledge your emotions. Let the tears flow without judgment, and take it as an opportunity to examine your feelings.

Do one small thing each morning that makes you feel good.

Doing something in the morning that makes you feel healthy, grounded, and happy — like eating a hearty breakfast, listening to your favorite podcast, or taking a walk — can help shift focus away from perfection anxiety as you prepare for your day.

Visualize a past insecurity — and let it go.

If you feel burdened with past failures and insecurities going back to childhood, visualize each one and picture yourself discarding it — burning it, tearing it up, throwing it away. You’ll ease the burden and give yourself permission to move on.

When facing a challenge that causes self-doubt, think of a time in your past when you overcame an obstacle.

Take deep breaths and recall a time when you persevered. Remember that you’ve made it through difficult situations before, and when you do, you’ll feel more resilient so you can overcome whatever you’re facing now.

Next time you’re struggling with a negative self-judgment, reframe it in your favor

You know that old study about how smiling can actually improve your mood? Same thing applies for getting out of a negative mindset. Keep focusing on the positive, and thinking about the positive — eventually you are going to start feeling positive, too.

When you’re struggling, treat yourself like you’d treat a friend.

We tend to be kinder and more compassionate to others — why not treat yourself the same way? If you wouldn’t say it to a close friend, don’t say it to yourself.

Take a moment to share your gratitude with someone who loves you as you are.

Thank someone in your life who reminds you that you’re beautiful and unique even during moments when it’s hard to show yourself that same compassion. A quick email, phone call, text, or Post-it note will make both you and your loved one feel special.

Take a few minutes tore-examine one of your goals.

Pick one thing that matters to you and commit to making your goal more realistic. Instead of setting yourself up for failure by aiming for perfection, adjust your goal so you can reach it — or exceed it.

Make time for things that matter by dropping things that don’t.

When you give yourself permission to cut loose the things that drain your energy and don’t truly benefit you — like perfection anxiety or negative self-talk — you’ll have more time and energy left for what you really value.

Every day, do one thing to prioritize your mental health.

Positive mental health exercises have the greatest impact when you do them every day. So whether you meditate, pray, stretch, or write in a gratitude journal, commit to finding time each day. If it helps, set a calendar reminder.

While shaving, identify something new to love about yourself.

Don’t just think it, say it out loud! Whatever it is — a scar, a stretch mark, something you accomplished or a struggle that made you who you are — verbalizing love for the things that make you “you” will help train your brain to reframe the false narrative of negative self-talk. And it will give you perspective to be a role model for others.

Fill your feed with reality.

Stop following people on social media who make you feel bad about yourself (whether they mean to or not). When you follow people who share your values, you’ll be less likely to chase a false image of perfection.

Pick a time of day to recite an affirmation that means something to you.

Whether it’s a hip-hop lyric, a Bible verse,or something you come up with on your own, saying an uplifting mantra during everyday moments like shaving or brushing your teeth can stop perfection anxiety in its tracks.

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